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this morning. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >>> i'm john berman, barely. >> he's back. >> it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. >> we're in the beginning of the second term, jason wu's second term. over the pan of 18 minutes, president obama made his vision of his second term crystal clear, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part le
interviews here on the "closing bell." stay with us. two ceos and two financial giants. john stumpf will be are here and ebay ceo john donahoe. >> best earnings ever. the dow up 107. the high of the day a gain of 122 points. energy is doing well and disney is the biggest gainer. bank of america though not. it's down 3% after their earnings came out so they are not helping that today but the dow, 13,622. if it closed right there, that would be a new five and a half year high. the s&p, any positive close is another five-year high. for the nasdaq -- s&p up 11 points right now at 1483 and change. major averages staging this late-day rally. can the markets close above the five-year highs. that's what we're talking about here. >> wants us to go higher. clerk it out in today "closing bell" exchange. josh brown, cnbc contributor from fusion analytics and michael farr, cnbc contributor from farr, miller and our own rick santelli. hey, guys, how you doing. michael fax let's kick this off to you. what do you attribute this very strong rally today. >> i don't think anything in terms of the earn
to sort of talk a -- at 1940, i'm sorry 1820. he writes a letter to john adams and he says our duty as americans is teen neologism he creates the word. jefferson him is creating all these words and some of them -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire but for the footstool. there are 114 words now and the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson as a corner or the introducer and the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. i'm sorry. mona craddock meaning a person who is in a single room. the one that he does the most with and becomes the most egregious with the purest and the language police is the word be little. he creates the word be little and he knows he is creating something that is going to be very disturbing and noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact he wanted to know webster's teachers at yale who writes noah webster about the word be little and the british hate the word when fowler comes up with modern english usage in 1938 in the first edition. fowler is still
'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty as americans is to neologize, to create new phrases. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the foot stool. he creates -- there's just, there are 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, that's teddy roosevelt. monocrat meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one he does probably the most with and becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creates the word belittle, he knows what he's up to. he knows he's creating something that's going to be very disturbing. noah webster himself loves the word. in fact, one of noah webster's teachers at yale writes noah webster a letter about the word "belittle," and it extends -- the british hate the wor
.t. startups, and john baackes is also with us of new atlantic ventures which invests mostly in mobile technology and e-commerce. john, we'll start with you. how much of this decline had to do with concerns of the fiscal cliff at the end of last year? what do you think? >> the decline, bill, if you take a look at it, was completely represented in the clean tech sector and the life sciences sector. the sectors we invest in are software and internet. this was the best year, 2012, for software investments since 2001. it was the second best year for internet investments since 2001. so the total picture might look grim, but in the space of technology. software and internet, it's a good story. >> software and internet as it relates to health care, or software and internet across the board, john? >> software and internet across the board. >> very interesting. yeah, go ahead. >> life sciences was down. double digits. clean tech was down almost 40%. the reason those two were down, bill, to your question about the fiscal cliff. >> right. >> is they both depend on government policy. clean tech to
'm john berman. >> and i'm christine romans. "starting point" with soledad o'brien starts right now. >>> welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, making history. president obama's second inaugural address. a lot of firsts. we'll take a look at the impact of his speech. and incredible moments from the day and the night, including the first lady's dresses. and the buzz on the obama girls, sasha and malia. >> she sparked the investigation that led david petraeus to resign. now jill kelly trying to cleey her name. >>> and is 2013 the year of the house? housing values expecting to go up. >>> and we'll have the presidential poet, doug wiem. howard kurtz with his exclusive interview on jill kelley and james spider marks. "starting point" begins right now. good morning, everyone. our "starting point," an emboldened president, obama playing encourager in chief. telling the american people we are made for this moment. an 18-minute long inaugural speech, coincided with martin luther king jr. day. he talked about several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth
for more. john schriffen, abc news, new york. >> wow. that's an amazing perspective. there's 800,000 volunteer firefighters. the whole reason he did this is to show what they have to do day in and day out, because they're fighting cuts in their particular county. in highland park. and they wanted to show the leaders there and officials this is what we go through on a day-to-day basis. >> unbelievable. you have to be in great shape. >> kudos. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my d
of hell. with more now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n., fox news contributor john bolton. sir, good morning to you. what us did this say about the state of the terror group? >> well, al qaeda in the u.s. islamic mag greg -- maghreb taken over in northern mali has taken strength since the fall of muammar qaddafi. this is the one of the consequences of overthrowing muammar qaddafi that we didn't pay continuing attention to as we should have. i think it also highlights an important point worldwide. the war on terror is not over. usama bin laden may be dead but al qaeda has metastasized and is a threat now in many, many, regions around the world. so the idea that somehow we don't have to worry about international terrorism, i think this should put it to rest. bill: they're talking about adding american drones to give surveillance for the french troops on the ground. i want to show viewers on our screen here. egypt, we talked a lot about, mr. ambassador, you know that. you mentioned qaddafi in libya. you make the case a lot of arms that came out of libya when qaddafi was out of power, th
. >> i present the people's gavel to the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> despite a rocky few weeks during december's fiscal cliff negotiations, representative john boehner winning re-election as speaker of the house. this congress -- the most diverse in history, with a record number of women and minorities. among them is the first buddhist to join the senate, as well as the first hindu and the first openly bisexual woman in the house. secretary of state hillary clinton heading back to work after being released from a new york city hospital following treatment for a blood clot. many lawmakers demanding clinton testify about the terror attack in benghazi before voting on her potential successor, nominee senator john kerry. google chairman eric schmidt and former new mexico governor bill richardson arriving in north korea. his visit drawing criticism from the state department because it comes only weeks after a controversial north korean rocket launch. the delegation defends its trip to the communist nation. >> this is a private humanitarian visit. we're here as individual american ci
theories. there's conspiracies all the way back to wroelz and john birch and the militia movement. these are people who are inclined to believe that the government is out to get them anyway, the media is in cahoots with it, and they jump on events like sandy hook as just further confirmation of these things. basically they kind service this confirmation bias as psychologists call it to look for only evidence that supports their theories and disregard anything that says otherwise. in a way it kind of helps explain what happened, explain this tragedy. it kind of gives meaning to why all these children died. >> and alex, you spoke to a man named gene rosen, the man who sheltered six students fleeing from the shooting at sandy hook in his house and i diel spoke to him last night. he came up to me off krarcamera. and he's weeping because he's being harassed by people who believe he made up the entire experience, that he's part of some sort of government hoax. >> yeah, this is really tragic. this is a guy who just happened to be in the right place at the right time to help. he lives jus
, if john boehner and mitch mcconnell think that they can come up with a plan that somehow meets their criteria that they've set for why they will -- when they will raise the debt ceiling, they're free to go ahead and try. but the proposals that they've put forward in order to accomplish that -- only by cutting spending -- means cuts to things like medicare and education that the american people profoundly reject. now, if they think that they can get that through congress, then they're free to try. but i think that a better way of doing this is go ahead and say, we're going to pay our bills. the question now is how do we actually get our deficit in a manageable, sustainable way? and that's a conversation i'm happy to have. all right. matt spetalnick. >> thank you, sir. you've spoken extensively about the debt ceiling debate, but some republicans have further said that they're willing to allow a government shutdown to take place rather than put off deep spending cuts. are you prepared to allow the government to grind to a halt if you disagree with the spending cut proposals they p
three days before john f. kennedy was sworn in. here is a portion from his farewell address. >> crisis there will continue to be. in meeting them whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a temptation to feel could become to all our difficulties. development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture. a dramatic expansion in research. these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel. but each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration, the need to maintain balance in and among national programs. balance between the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desireable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. good judgment seeks balance in progress, lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration. >> words of preside
a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very strong and rapid responses to the contaminant, which we have seen. but many of the other insect groups, for in
are shortening lives by making people fat. john blackstone reports on coke's new ad campaign. >> for over 125 years -- >> reporter: in a way there's a remarkable confession in the tv ads coca-cola started running last night. the soft drink giant admits its products are part of the obesity problem, but only part of it. >> all calories count, no matter where they come from including coca-cola and everything else with calories. >> the corporate say we're good guys, here to help not here to hurt anybody. >> reporter: ira kalb is a marketing prover at the university of southern california. >> they are trying to position themselves as part of the solution, and they are part of the solution. >> reporter: they make a sugary soft drink. >> it's marketing saying you make a sugary soft drink and like everything you should drink that in moderation. >> reporter: the coca-cola company said there's a conversation going on how to address obesity and we want to be part of that conversation. ♪ i'd like to teach the world to sing ♪ >> reporter: coca-cola once taught the world to sing,
the honorable louie gohmert to act as speaker pro tempore on this day, signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend andrew walton, capitol hill presbyterian church, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. god of light and life, we give thanks for the gift of the day. a day which stands on the threshold of possibility and potential for the presence and power of love. love ensconced in every human at creation. love, which we are called to share with one another, as well as with creation itself. as we begin a historic weekend of service, celebration, and inauguration, fill us with your creative imagination to find our way to reconciliation where there is separation. to mercy where there is judgment. and to peace where there is violence. hold each of us, our leaders, our nation, and our earth in your eternal care. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rul
, president of the united states, and on the other, john adams is no more. that celebration, the union and be out, -- the unit in the out, that is what we are looking for , the relationship. you can look at these inaugurations as touchstones along our national narrative of the changes that have taken place. some of them are technological. the question of george washington writing in a carriage, somebody else in a car, the introduction of radio, television and the internet to record these things -- there are different steps along the way to record, but a continuity -- a kind of reassuring continuity that is important for holidays. you know that thanksgiving in our houses like this. we serve mashed potatoes this way. we have our inaugurations this way. there is very much the same kind of spirit. i pulled a few simple things to give you a sense of the taste and feel of inaugurations. one aspect of inaugurations really from the very beginning is the inaugural ball. these are celebrations in which this candidate, now president, is introduced to the public thomas as well as celebrations of e
in covering the story of former corporal john hammar injustly held in mexico. was chained to his bed for a short time. shortly before christmas they released him from pressure from the factor and other media. joining us from miami is corporal hammar. how are you feeling? >> i am feeling a lot better. >> when you first got out of prison, though, and you walked across to the u.s. your doctor who is on the program told me you were really in bad shape. did you know you were so physically rundown? >> i was dehydrated, malnourished. i had a lung infection, stomach issues a number of things. >> what caused all of that? >> i think it was just in a bad environment. i lasted the majority of the time without getting sick, but up until the end is when i started getting a little ill. >> let's pick it up when your ordeal began. you drive down with a friend to brownsville texas. you check in with the u.s. authorities. what do you tell the u.s. people? >> we told them we have got this hunting shot gun and we are trying to go through mexico legally what do we have to do? they gave us paperwork to set
mark zandy, former economic adviser to john mccain. this is generally agreed to by most economists, for every dollar invested in infrastructure, you get $1.57 back into the american economy. so you're not just putting a dollar in, you are getting the american economy going, but putting people to work. buy food, pay taxes, support their families, and build for tomorrow's disaster. putting in place the infrastructure that is hardened, that is protected, eliminating the potential in this specific case of flooding of the subway systems in new york city. i know that you talked about doing this in your area for the storm. you may want to pick that back and i want to come back and talk by my own district in california. . mr. tonko: people have said that there is a need for government, they want effective government, efficient government. well, i think when we look at some of the data that are collected, representative garamendi, it is important for us to acknowledge that as we rebuild in our areas that have been damaged by mother nature, you don't just replace, you need to improve upon th
the exact opposite. trying to drive as big a wedge as he possibly can. cbs news director, john dickerson, calling for president obama to pulverize, destroy and go for the throat of the g.o.p. as of this hour we've seen no response to cbs news management. at pat buchanan joins us. pat, an interesting observation from a member of the news media. >> and at this hour. >> he with as not a big fan of the media. >> what he said was there's an apparent bias deep in some of the networks and quite obviously true of mr. dickerson, i think really went off the deep end here. my guess is the big heads at cbs are now talking about what to do about mr. dickerson. >> greta: well, actually i sort of appreciate sometimes when things like this happen because it sort of peels back the cap, so to speak so people are at least honest about stuff. >> and see things as they are, not as they are shown to be, that's exactly right. you've got an honest candid view of this fellow, what he thinks of republican party and what the president ought to do it to it. >> greta: and moving onto the president's inaugural speech
is the vice president at usaa investments. he joins me now from san antonio for a fox business exclusive. john, it is always good to speak with you. i'm courses you, you know -- i'm curious, we've had the big marks, especially the s&p hitting multiyear highs, but you say there's reason to be concerned. what is it? >> we have seen the equity market outperform the economy over the last couple of years due to the large monetary and fiscal stimulus, but recently we have seen earnings decelerate and our concern is just what's going to happen to top of line revenue growth to companies and then in particular their forward guidance, particularly for those companies who are exposed to consumer spending because of the recent 2% payroll tax hike. cheryl: okay. so do you think at this point as we look at the economy versus the markets and in particular the housing sector, which many analysts and many economists point to as being such a good thing, if the housing market does not have that true, true rebound in 2013, do you think that that is going to affect market performance? >> yes, we do. we're looking
. now let's go to the other house. let's read, and i'll read for you, what senator john cornyn said. he said, we will raise the debt ceiling. he doesn't say may. he says we will. of course he is in the senate. we're not going to default on our debt. both of these gentlemen are on the right track. i personally think in my emotional state i might not have wanted to increase the debt ceiling but i think politics of course we can't be naive. the president has a very big platform for his strategy. he has the bully pulpit. and i think that some media are calling this a retreat on the debt ceiling. to me the only retreat in the equation is williamsburg, virginia. but i do think that now we can concentrate on what andy brenner and i were talking about yesterday and that is march 1st the sequester. march 27th the continuing resolution because we haven't seen both houses pass a budget and i think these issues are much easier to extract from the democrats/the white house because the short-term bumps are going to put a lot of pressure and lot of press in my opinion on the main issue and the main is
person in the staff, they read a book called "rising tide," help me with the author? >> john berry. >> john berry. it is the history of how the mississippi river was changed to accommodate navigation and the impacts of the flood creating the conditions that we actually saw during hurricane katrina, but i highly recommend that. from our learnings in the gulf, what would you do to help develop resiliency in low income and rural communities that we know face disasters, especially in regards to the potential for hydrofracking? >> yeah. has not been asked a hard question yet. [laughter] >> that's a very good question. what i say we learned from the gulf and from similar disasters around the world is that it's really with social impact, fear about the chemicals or a whole series of different things that are fixable if we can improve our communication skills, our knowledge, and our willingness to share and tell the truth. to me, one of the most telling problems that came out of the gulf was was dispercent. how many of you heard of that? nearly everybody raises their hand. if i ask that on
yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab the debt ceiling and some degree of trimming the fat, but i don't know how that is going to happen with
] ♪ ♪ we've got to see how john fugelsang ♪ ♪ we got to see aisha too ♪ ♪ look at that look at that ♪ ♪ funny for nothing, funny for nothing, funny for nothing, and the bits for free ♪ ♪ funny for nothing, funny for nothing, funny for nothing, and the bits for free ♪ ♪ funny for nothing, funny for nothing, and the bits for free ♪ >> yay! [ applause ] >> stephanie: yay! rocky mountain mike will be there saturday. all of the sexy liberal luminaries will be there. all right. sheryl in wisconsin. >> caller: hi i watched washington journal show this morning, and a man called washington journal saying he had to get out of the nra. they asked him why. and he said they keep hassling him for money constantly, i guess, on the mail on the phone. he said they never used to call before -- >> stephanie: remember, there are 315 million of us -- whatever their numbers are, who cares, right? and i hope a lot of people quit over that ad that brought the president's children in to this and this violent video game they put out. are they trying to get called hyp
. >> mayor john cook from el paso. from the panel, how important is it to present reform in his state of the city redress? >> it's extremely important. as i mentioned the opening, and, it has to be opened up and placed on track to not everybody knows in the united states of america, everybody today named, they have to know at the time has come to address the very serious issue and also tell the real story and the positive impact we have. we know that when you talk about billions of dollars being generated, hard-working people, people willing to do any type of job to support families, people want to work hard to support their case said they become engineers, scientists, this is the time. i think it has to be perhaps carved in a positive way, saying this is the right thing. it's absolutely important for president obama. it's the right time to make those comments. >> mayor, occasionally a nice, good policy and good politics come together in the right time and that's exactly what's going on with immigration reform. it's been a very public policy for a long time. now the politics seem to b
pursuit. >>> timely free from the mexican prison where he was held for four months. john hammer was chained to his bed at times. he was there on a questionable gun charge after crossing the border with a fellow veteran on a surfing trip. he took an antique shotgun that used to belong to his great grandfather. officials said he could bring it into mexico with the proper paperwork. as soon as he crossed the border he was arrested and taken to jail. i spoke with hammer's parents in early december. they told me the conditions in prison were a nightmare and obviously terrible for him and them. after intervention from politicians, john hammer has finally been released. he joins me live. it is very good to see you become here. first of all, how are you doing? >> i'm all right, anderson. i'm doing a lot better. i was sick when i first got out. i spent five days in the hospital. but i think i'm doing a lot better right now. >> when you crossed the border, you told the u.s. border officials that you had this old gun, that you wanted to bring it down on this trip with you. what did they te
will be resolved but analysts say the crisis will cost the company a lot of money to put it right. john hendricks is at the corporate headquarters in chicago. >> for boeing the problems are serious and develop their most technologically advanced plane to date and that technology is not completely working. in boston, a week and a half ago the plane had battery problems on the ground and was grounded. then in japan on thursday within of those dream liners were in the air and the battery began smoking and emitting a corrosive substance and the plane landed and everybody had to be evacuated on the inflatable slide. this is a serious problem for boeing because it's the battery technology that's the innovation on those planes. those batteries replaced the hydraulics that operate many of the functions and make the plane lighter and lighter planes are cheaper to fly because they use less fuel. the number of countries around the world grounded airplanes, all 50 planes that have been deployed are no longer operating as they try to figure out the battery problems. however, compensation will be seeked. while
-span2, attorney general eric holder and tsa administrator john pistole at the u.s. conference of mayors followed by mayors and homeland security officials discussing the u.s.-mexico border. later, another look at gun violence was chicago mayor rham emmanuel and former congressman oeven latourette. >> i do solemnly swear. [applause] >> this weekend that 57 presidential inauguration as president obama begins his second term sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house live shortly before noon eastern. your phone calls and a look back at the president's 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the public inaugural ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other inaugural festivities including the capitol luncheon in the afternoon parade live all day coverage beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time on c-span , c-span radio and c-span.org and throughout the day join the conversation by phone, facebook and on twitter. >> and throughout inauguration day our website has additional features including video feeds from our c-span crews, video on
: john in stillwell, oklahoma, thank you for holing. you're on the air. >> caller: thank you. i have a question about your mother, i'm curious. you said that her personality change, when she went from one environment to another, what environment was the environment she was going to that caused the permit change? do you think that it was a culture thing from that environment? if so, can you elaborate more on the culture that she had -- that had changed her personality and what you think needs to be done? >> guest: yeah, you know, well, what happened was that when my father came here to the united states, my mother was left with us back in mexico, and she had to suffer, you know, the way a lot of wives suffer when they see their husbands go to another country, and there was a fear of being forgotten, abandoned, him finding another woman while he's gone. this was a fear that my mother had every single day about my father finding himself another woman here in the u.s., and forgetting about us and about her so she had to deal with this every single day, and when my father sent for her, it
dulles and john foster dulles. >> exactly. our actions in 1954 in guatemala taking down the arbwenz government unleashed decades of civil war in that country that ended up killing more than 200,000 people. and rigoberta menchu is the person who must perform a fis the struggle of the mayan people drought that time. -- who personifies the struggle of the mayan people throughout that time. this is another reason why we just felt really compelled to make this film and to work through the seven years in order to bring this to fruition. >> juan gonzalez, the comments of ann coulter;s , as when she said, "i think so our rights are for blacks. what have we done to the immigrants? we all black people something. we have a legacy of slavery. immigrants have an even been in this country." >> she neglects to deal with the reality in of u.s.-mexican history. the entire southwest of the u.s. was taken from mexico and the mexican-american war of 1846. there were mexicans living on the land when the u.s. to get over in the tree of guadalupe hidalgo. you know, some mexicans often say the original --
are going to have to answer to. two republican justices, john d roberts -- i didn't see kennedy, but they're looking at them to how decisions are going to come down when they hear the arguments in march. >> you know, when martin luther king first spoke on the mall, i was living here. and i was coming down, and people were screaming at all of the black people who were coming to hear him, and they were screaming and throwing things and calling them african bullies. and today, when i was watching this scene, that's all i could think about, was the hatred that was coming from everywhere toward the people and toward martin luther king. and there was an interesting body language with obama today. he seemed so much more confident. he sort of loped out, you know. last time, he was more, you know, sort of formal and ridged. >> we call it swagger. >> yeah, like i own it now. i'm here. and you could sense that he really felt, even in this last four years that so much had changed, and he was able to talk more about equality. it seemed to me there was more about equality in his speech today. and i don
enough. this is one of those reformers. senator john udall. and the executive director of the democratic national committee. thank you both for being here. >> thank you, great to be here with you, chris. you started covering this very early. >> senator, you just sat down and i said this morning before this interview i looked at the notes that i transcribed from the interview i did in your office on 2011 on precisely this issue which was the last time it was with you and senator merkley proposing changes to the filibuster and you got a little bit of attention. and it ultimately, nothing happened. two years later, you're in a much better position so i guess my first question is, where are we on the right now? it's been very difficult as a reporter to kind of gain where this is. this is very inside baseball. where are things from your standpoint? >> well, the first thing that's tremendously important is we need to change the way we do business in the senate. everybody knows that the senate is broken. that it's not operating the way it should and you just laid out all of the figures and stat
adams, patrick in in, john hancock, and the secret band of radicals who led the colonies to war, i always worry with the subtitles if the publisher is fond of having attack on them attack on him as he read the setup you need to read the book -- [laughter] the truth is this is the story of the men, the radicals who took us into the revolution. i said from the beginning that the day the shot was fired around world was heard, my book was finished it because i discovered i had run across an article published in the new times at the beginning of the current housing bubbles bursting that it wasn't the first time that such a thing had happened. and i began to tug on the thread of that, of that slave of history. and before you knew it, before i knew it, i had this book begun. let me try different way of bringing you into what it's about. in the wake of the recent presidential campaigns, the question of the day seems to be what now? a financial cliff looms, a partisan standoff in congress threatens, and modern-day tea partiers vowed that their control of republican fiscal policies will the
it at a whole nother level. >> that's true. but how long does that last or people feel that emotionally? john, this never happens, i'll give you the final word. >> an interesting day because mark sanford announced he's running for congress. >> and his wife is not. >> left office in 2009 because of an affair. it strikes me as interesting on this day when we talk about lance armstrong whether he can be rehabilitated. >> apples and oranges. >> this guy is running for congress and he was chased from office and now he's back and running for office. >> he sued people that called him out. >> we'll see. that's a very interesting question. he has a good chance. >>> in just a few hours at 11:55 eastern a.m., of course, president obama will announce his new gun control agenda. we know how that some family members from the newtown, connecticut, will be joining the president. you want to stay with cnn for special coverage of that announcement. it begins with wolf blitzer at 11:55 a.m. eastern time right here on cnn. tomorrow we'll be talking with texas congressman rahim castro, new york congressman peter
people who contribute so much to the program. i also want to say a special word of thanks to john horsley, tony keane and jack basso for extraordinary service over many, many years to improving transportation, to improving all that has gone on in transportation for a long period of time. will you help me thank them for their great, great work that they have done? [applause] for a long time. and i want to thank trb for encouraging young people. all the young people that are here. the future is very bright. the future is bright in transportation. there will be many opportunities, and i know that you enjoyed your lunch and i hope that just rubbing elbows and talking to people in transportation will encourage you for the opportunities that lie ahead for you. and they would not really be available without great leadership on trb's behalf for you, but thank you all for being here but more importantly to trb thank you for encouraging young people. when president obama first asked me to do this job we had a lot of work ahead of us. we were facing the greatest economic crisis in over a generation
that the services is being provided. if there were no johns, there wouldn't be this problem. >> reporter: the is suspects in this case will eventually end newspaper a jail but the victims, they'll end up here at a hotel. it's where i find alea waiting for them. she's a federal victims assistance specialist. >> i've been working specifically with survivors of human trafficking for about eight years now. >> reporter: hers is perhaps the hardest job, easing these women nool a life of freedom. >> nationally, there's some hesitation because we are a complete stranger. we are affiliated with law enforcement but our job is to try to build that rapport, try to put them at ease and hopefully be able to assist them and assist the case that we have going on. >> reporter: the operation's over before lunch. at least 50 people are take neen custody and 11 women freed. authorities call it a good day. >> this isn't the end to human trafficking. this is a worldwide phenomena and sadly it goes on as we speak. got to attack it relentlessly every, every day. >> reporter: as for the women rescued in this cas
." >> good morning, everybody. it's 7:26. i'm john kelly. we want to take you to portland. we have been covering a bizarre rescue scene at a parking garage. a cinder block wall. a foot space between the wall and parking garage. a woman at 3:30 this morning dropped and fell 15 to 20 feet. she's stuck dangling four feet above the ground. rescue crews have been there since 3:30 trying to get her out. you can see her arm. they finally got close enough to get to her. they handed her water moments ago. this is a long drawn out scene. at 3:30 this morning neighbors heard a woman screaming. they called 911. they have been on scene trying to free her up. they are close now. you can see trying to get her out. she had a flannel shirt on as police workers try to pull her out. we'll keep you updated. good progress there as they try to get her out. now let's check on the wednesday forecast. christina loren has sunny skies and crisp temperatures. >> a good-looking day shaping up. a live look at a clear start over san jose. it's hazy this morning. temperatures are cold. 3 is degrees in livermore. 32 in
of abraham lincoln's skull, the bones of john wilkes. would you like to see it? i go see it. he doesn't have the artifacts from the london assassination. they had the others as well. i start thinking what if they had a serial killer re-creating the crimes of all the assassins. i is that i had's the plot for my -- i said that's the plot for my book. he wants to be the fifth assassin. >>steve: what's the name of this museum? >> the national museum of health and medicine. they moved it skwr d.c. to maryland. i held the bones of booth. and they have garfield's killer's brain. holding a jar with a brain in it; that's a cool day at work. >>steve: that's some museum i've never been to. i've never held a brain before in a museum. you started there, at that museum, and then you wind up with the idea for your new novel. but did you some real research. and the four assassins who killed american presidents do have some things in common, don't they? >> they don't do drugs. they're barely drinkers. they're all meticulously neat, of all things. and they are all four men with a cause. that's why they're so
deal with the john birch society issue, the extremists of the site, how it should deal with troubles with the young americans for freedom's a very important conservative and from a -- organization. dr. edwards was i believe the first or early editors of the newspaper back in the early 60's. he started very young and has known rusher for that long. rusher would advise the "national review" people and of course above all buckley who was the owner and therefore really the man they are, what was going on out there, and the conservatives, what the problems were in conservative politics, what the opportunities and challenges, what things were happening and what ought to be supported. buckley though is very interested in maintaining -- developing and then maintaining a high reputation for "national review," a reputation as a thoughtful magazine. at one point he writes to his colleagues there and says, no, know it was an editorial. in 1960. he says to the reader's, but he would have said it equally to his colleagues, our job is not to make practical politics. it's really to think and write a
was heartened that republican senator john mccain and others have been discussing solutions. given the country's current fiscal fights, is it realistic to expect immigration anytime soon so how does the mayor feel about local immigration initiatives? well, immigration is not the only topic on the mayor's agenda. he has been discussing gun control, the economy, and many other matters. some have taken notice of his travel to latin america and some are asking whether his position in the obama and administration will be part of his future. please join me in welcoming the mayor of los angeles, antonio villaraigosa. [applause] >> thank you for that lovely introduction. thank you for inviting me here today to the national press club. before i start, i grew up in a home where we are used to serving ourselves. so where ever i am serve, i always like to thank our servers. i would like to give them a big hand. [applause] i would like to particularly thank the members of the press club for this opportunity to speak i am honored to be here at this public deliberation. my final term as mayor in los angeles
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